Tag Archives: central obesity

Impact of Abdominal Obesity on Incidence of Adverse Metabolic Effects Associated With Antihypertensive Medications — Cooper-DeHoff et al. 55 (1): 61 — Hypertension

Impact of Abdominal Obesity on Incidence of Adverse Metabolic Effects Associated With Antihypertensive Medications — Cooper-DeHoff et al. 55 (1): 61 — Hypertension

Impact of Abdominal Obesity on Incidence of Adverse Metabolic Effects Associated With Antihypertensive Medications
Rhonda M. Cooper-DeHoff; Sheron Wen; Amber L. Beitelshees; Issam Zineh; John G. Gums; Stephen T. Turner; Yan Gong; Karen Hall; Vishal Parekh; Arlene B. Chapman; Eric Boerwinkle; Julie A. Johnson

From the Colleges of Pharmacy (R.M.C.-D., S.W., J.G.G., Y.G., J.A.J.) and Medicine (R.M.C.-D., J.G.G., K.H., J.A.J.) and Center for Pharmacogenomics (R.M.C.-D., S.W., J.G.G., Y.G., J.A.J.), University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla; School of Medicine (A.L.B.), University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md; US Food and Drug Administration (I.Z.), Silver Spring, Md; Mayo Clinic College of Medicine (S.T.T.), Rochester, Minn; Morehouse School of Medicine (V.P.), Atlanta, Ga; School of Medicine (A.B.C.), Emory University, Atlanta, Ga; Human Genetics Center and Institute of Molecular Medicine (E.B.), University of Texas at Houston, Houston, Tex.

Correspondence to Rhonda M. Cooper-DeHoff, Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Rd, Box 100486, Gainesville, FL 32610-0486. E-mail [email protected]

We assessed adverse metabolic effects of atenolol and hydrochlorothiazide among hypertensive patients with and without abdominal obesity using data from a randomized, open-label study of hypertensive patients without evidence of cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus. Intervention included randomization to 25 mg of hydrochlorothiazide or 100 mg of atenolol monotherapy followed by their combination. Fasting glucose, insulin, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and uric acid levels were measured at baseline and after monotherapy and combination therapy. Outcomes included new occurrence of and predictors for new cases of glucose ≥100 mg/dL (impaired fasting glucose), triglyceride ≥150 mg/dL, high-density lipoprotein ≤40 mg/dL for men or ≤50 mg/dL for women, or new-onset diabetes mellitus according to the presence or absence of abdominal obesity. Abdominal obesity was present in 167 (58%) of 395 patients. Regardless of strategy, in those with abdominal obesity, 20% had impaired fasting glucose at baseline compared with 40% at the end of study (P<0.0001). Proportion with triglycerides ≥150 mg/dL increased from 33% at baseline to 46% at the end of study (P<0.01). New-onset diabetes mellitus occurred in 13 patients (6%) with and in 4 patients (2%) without abdominal obesity. Baseline levels of glucose, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein predicted adverse outcomes, and predictors for new-onset diabetes mellitus after monotherapy in those with abdominal obesity included hydrochlorothiazide strategy (odds ratio: 46.91 [95% CI: 2.55 to 862.40]), female sex (odds ratio: 31.37 [95% CI: 2.10 to 468.99]), and uric acid (odds ratio: 3.19 [95% CI: 1.35 to 7.52]). Development of adverse metabolic effect, including new-onset diabetes mellitus associated with short-term exposure to hydrochlorothiazide and atenolol was more common in those with abdominal obesity. Key Words: atenolol • hydrochlorothiazide • abdominal obesity • metabolic syndrome • new-onset diabetes mellitus • hypertension
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Obesity In Mid-Life Linked To Risk Of Frailty

Obesity among middle-age people increases the risk of illness and death later in life, according to Finnish researchers.

A team of researchers studied more than 1,000 men from age 25 to mid-70s and found that those who were overweight during their 40s followed by a period of weight loss were more susceptible to illness and death as they got older.

Writing in the European Heart Journal, researchers said that while obesity has been linked to risk of heart disease, other studies have shown that being overweight can actually help in situations of heart failure.

Posted on: Monday, 25 May 2009, 11:23 CDT

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Body Shape and Heart Disease Risk: Apple Or Pear Shape Is Not Main Culprit To Heart Woes — It’s Liver Fat

Body Shape and Heart Disease Risk:

Apple Or Pear Shape Is Not Main Culprit To Heart Woes — It’s Liver Fat

ScienceDaily (Dec. 8, 2008) — For years, pear-shaped people who carry weight in the thighs and backside have been told they are at lower risk for high blood pressure and heart disease than apple-shaped people who carry fat in the abdomen. But new findings from nutrition researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggest body-shape comparisons don’t completely explain risk.

In two studies, they report excess liver fat appears to be the real key to insulin resistance, cholesterol abnormalities and other problems that contribute to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Having too much fat stored in the liver is known as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.


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Myths vs Reality in the Fight Against Belly Fat

Newsweek.com

Six Facts About Belly Fat
Do those flat-abs diets work? We sort through the myths and realities of fighting waistline weight gain.

By Karen Springen | NEWSWEEK

Published Nov 7, 2008

 
There’s an abs diet, a flat-belly diet and a host of other plans out there for getting rid of a paunch. But is there really a specific exercise formula or particular food that can give you Michael Phelps-like abs without swimming eight hours a day?


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Central Obesity & Dementia; Diet, Vitamin D, Calcium, & Colon Cancer

Central Obesity & Dementia; Diet, Vitamin D, Calcium, & Colon Cancer | MND: Your Daily Dose of Counter-Theory:

Robert A. Wascher, MD, FACS

Central Obesity & Dementia; Diet, Vitamin D, Calcium, & Colon Cancer

2008-10-05 at 5:09 pm ·

The information in this column is intended for informational purposes only, and does not constitute medical advice or recommendations by the author. Please consult with your physician before making any lifestyle or medication changes, or if you have any other concerns regarding your health.

CENTRAL OBESITY & DEMENTIA

We are, quite plainly, the heaviest society in the recorded history of mankind. More than 60% of adult Americans are overweight, and one-fourth of the U.S. population is frankly obese.

There is ample clinical evidence showing that obesity is associated with an increased risk of high blood pressure (hypertension), diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis and premature death. Some cancers also appear to be more common among obese patents, including cancers of the breast, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, colon, rectum, uterus and kidney.

Although generalized obesity is a risk factor for all of the life-threatening diseases that I have described, the accumulation of excess body fat within and around the abdomen (central obesity) appears to be linked with an especially high risk of obesity-associated illnesses. Now, a new research study, just published in the journal Neurology, suggests that dementia may also be more common among patients with central obesity. ” More on this…

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