Tag Archives: obesity

Obesity: How Intestinal Bacteria May Cause Weight Gain

Obesity: How Intestinal Bacteria May Cause Weight Gain – Yahoo! News

Obesity: How Intestinal Bacteria May Cause Weight Gain

If you’re fighting the battle of the bulge, most of your attention – and frustration – is probably aimed at your midsection. It makes sense, since that’s where the extra pounds tend to gravitate, especially with the creep of middle age, piling on to form that dreaded spare tire.
But a growing body of research suggests there’s another, less visible reason to focus on your gut if you want to lose weight. Scientists led by Andrew Gewirtz at Emory University reveal that your intestines harbor a universe of bacteria – the so-called gut microbiota – that may play an important role in whether your body will store the food you eat as extra pounds.

Here’s the article…

Obesity In Mid-Life Linked To Risk Of Frailty

Obesity among middle-age people increases the risk of illness and death later in life, according to Finnish researchers.

A team of researchers studied more than 1,000 men from age 25 to mid-70s and found that those who were overweight during their 40s followed by a period of weight loss were more susceptible to illness and death as they got older.

Writing in the European Heart Journal, researchers said that while obesity has been linked to risk of heart disease, other studies have shown that being overweight can actually help in situations of heart failure.

Posted on: Monday, 25 May 2009, 11:23 CDT

Here’s the article…

Microbe Composition In Gut May Hold Key To One Cause Of Obesity

Microbe Composition In Gut May Hold Key To One Cause Of Obesity

Microbe Composition In Gut May Hold Key To One Cause Of Obesity ScienceDaily (Jan. 20, 2009) — Biodesign Institute in collaboration with colleagues at the Mayo Clinic, Arizona, and the University of Arizona, reveal a tantalizing link between differing microbial populations in the human gut and body weight among three distinct groups: normal weight individuals, those who have undergone gastric bypass surgery, and patients suffering the condition of morbid obesity—a serious, often life-threatening condition associated with diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer and psychosocial disorders. Obesity affects around 4 million Americans and, each year, some 300,000 die from obesity-related illness.

Here’s the article…

Obesity, Abnormal ‘Reward Circuitry’ In Brain Linked: Gene Tied To Dopamine Signaling Also Implicated In Overeating

Obesity, Abnormal ‘Reward Circuitry’ In Brain Linked: Gene Tied To Dopamine Signaling Also Implicated In Overeating:

“Obesity, Abnormal ‘Reward Circuitry’ In Brain Linked: Gene Tied To Dopamine Signaling Also Implicated In Overeating ScienceDaily (Oct. 17, 2008) — Using brain imaging and chocolate milkshakes, scientists have found that women with weakened ‘reward circuitry’ in their brains are at increased risk of weight gain over time and potential obesity. The risk increases even more for women who also have a gene associated with compromised dopamine signaling in the brain.”

(Via Obesity, Abnormal ‘Reward Circuitry’ In Brain Linked: Gene Tied To Dopamine Signaling Also Implicated In Overeating.)

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Depression, Obesity Coexist in Many Middle-Aged Women – Yahoo! News

Depression, Obesity Coexist in Many Middle-Aged Women – Yahoo! News:
Mon Jan 14, 11:47 PM ET
MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) — Obesity and depression often go hand-in-hand in middle-aged women, a new U.S. study found.

The research collected information on the height, weight, dietary and exercise habits, and body image of 4,641 women, ages 40 to 65, enrolled in a health plan. The women also completed a questionnaire used to measure depression symptoms.

Women with clinical depression were more than twice as likely to be obese (a body mass index of 30 or more), and obese women were more than twice as likely to be depressed, the study found.

It also found that women with BMIs of 30 or higher exercised the least, had the poorest body image, and consumed 20 percent more calories than women with ”

(Via Depression, Obesity Coexist in Many Middle-Aged Women – Yahoo! News.)

Obesity surgery seen as diabetes cure

Obesity surgery seen as diabetes cure
(AP): “AP – A new study gives the strongest evidence yet that obesity surgery can cure diabetes. Patients who had surgery to reduce the size of their stomachs were five times more likely to see their diabetes disappear over the next two years than were patients who had standard diabetes care, according to Australian researchers.”

(Via Obesity surgery seen as diabetes cure
(AP).)

BMI Calculator

Try out BMI and Weight Loss Calculator

This calculator measures both your Body Mass Index (BMI) and your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR).
For most people your BMI index coorelates with your percentage of body fat. Once you know your bmi index you can see where your current weight fits into the medical definition of obesity.
Your BMR tells you your basal metabolism which is how many calories that you burn every day as long as you don't move or eat.
How do I calculate BMI?
To use the calculator above select your sex, weight, height and age on the left.
On the right the big dial tells you your BMI. Your resting calories burned (BMR) is below that.
This formula isn't design for extremes. If you are extremely muscular or have extremely low body fat, you won't find accurate results.
What does my BMI number mean?
If your BMI is less that 18.5, you are underweight.
If your BMI is 18.5 - 24.9 you are in the normal range.
If your BMI is 25.0 - 29.9 you are considered overweight.
If your body fat index is over 30.0 you are considered obese.
How do I determine my ideal body weight?
If you want to know what your ideal weight is, drag the weight slider to the left until your BMI is between 18.5 and 25. I suggest that you start out with your goal a 24 BMI. Note what weight the calculator says gives you a BMI of 24. This is in the upper range of your ideal weight. Start with a goal in your upper range so that you don't feel overwhelmed. Subtract that weight from you current weight. Now you know how much weight you need to loose.
Why is it so hard to maintain my weight as I get older?
If you've been gaining the weight as you age, you can use this calculator to see how aging is affecting your metabolism. Before you start remember that an extra 3,500 calories is a pound of weight. Here's an example; if you are a 168 lb, 5'5" tall woman at 50 years of age your BMR resting metabolism will burn 47 less calories per day that you did at age 40. In other words, if you don't take care of yourself by eating fewer calories or exercising more, you could be gaining a pound every 3 months with the same lifestyle that you had 10 years earlier.
What else do I need to know? How about my waist to hip ratio?
Besides knowing your BMI you also need to know the size of your waist. When you measure your waist make sure the tape measure is snug and that its parallel to the floor.
If you are a woman and your waist is over 35 inches / 89cm, or if you are a man and your waist is over 40 inches / 102 cm then you are putting yourself at much greater risk for obesity related diseases.


Obesity Diseases:

CO puts you at rick for a myriad of detrimental dysfunctional conditions and diseases.
To find out more about obesity related disease the U.S. Center for Disease Control has a nice pdf that you can download here.
Related Terms: overweight calculator, bmr calculator, bmi calc, obesity disease, difference between obesity and overweight